Key issues to be discussed at G20 Sydney meeting

Thursday, 20 February 2014  Features

​Talks centre on what will happen now the United States Federal Reserve has begun scaling back its bond-buying program.​

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The Sydney G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meeting will be held over the weekend of 22-23 February 2014. Senior academics from UNSW’s Australian School of Business are available to give their analysis of the talks, the first major G20 meeting under Australia's 2014 presidency.

The Director of the Inst​itute of Global Finance, Professor Fariborz Moshirian from UNSW Australia said the talks centre on what will happen now the United States Federal Reserve has begun scaling back its bond-buying program.

Professor Fariborz Moshirian added “the top finance officials from the Group of 20 industrialised and developing nations will also discuss the volatility in emerging markets, and examine the role of the International Monetary Fund. In particular the US seems to have prevented the IMF from giving emerging markets such as China, Brazil and India greater say in the IMF's operations.”

He adds investment in infrastructure and innovation is crucial for the creation of economic growth and new employment in both developed and emerging economies. “Australia should also ensure difficult issues such as trade imbalances between China and the US will be raised. Outstanding issues with respect to large banks and their contributions to systemic risk should also be discussed.”

Top finance officials from the Group of 20 industrialised and developing nations are also expected to look at global trade, and the impact of the World Trade Organisation.

Other academics also available to comment on the G20 include Tim Harcourt, the JW Neville Fellow in Economics at UNSW’s Australian School of Business, who said “I argue the G20 should put trade at the heart of deliberations of a push for global growth.”

Plus Honorary Professor Raja Junankar from the Industrial Relations Research Centre at UNSW, who said “most of the countries of the OECD are still suffering from the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis, and this is likely to be the focus of much of the talks at the G20.”

For further details contact:
Fariborz Moshirian on 02 9385 5859 or Email f.moshirian@unsw.edu.au
Raja Junankar on 0416 511 694, or Email raja.junankar@unsw.edu.au
Tim Harcourt on 02 9385 3816, 0408 485 479, or Email tim.harcourt@unsw.edu.au.

Media contact:
Julian Lorkin: 02 9385 9887

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